FSExploitMe and Exploit-Exercises

If you are interested in learning about ActiveX exploitation, security researcher/consultant/professor Brad Antoniewicz has created FSExploitMe for just that purpose.

You’ll want a copy of Internet Explorer 8 to get the most out of it, but fortunately you can get a VM running IE8 for *free* from Microsoft.

And if you are interested in getting deeper into Linux exploitation, exploit-exercises.com has pre-built VM’s with capture-the-flag style levels and challenges for each level. It also has challenges for beginners to expert and is designed to teach:

[…]about a variety of computer security issues such as privilege escalation, vulnerability analysis, exploit development, debugging, reverse engineering, and general cyber security issues.

“Gang of Four” design patterns in Object-Pascal

Design Patterns: Elements of Reusable Object-Oriented Software is a software engineering book describing recurring solutions to common problems in software design. The book’s authors are Erich Gamma, Richard Helm, Ralph Johnson and John Vlissides with a foreword by Grady Booch. The book is divided into two parts, with the first two chapters exploring the capabilities and pitfalls of object-oriented programming, and the remaining chapters describing 23 classic software design patterns. The book includes examples in C++ and Smalltalk.

 

Amazon Link for the book: http://www.amazon.com/Design-Patterns-Elements-Reusable-Object-Oriented-ebook/dp/B000SEIBB8

I’ve been reading about OO (and non-OO) design patterns, and have found the “Gang of Four” Design Patterns book referenced again and again in my readings. I’ve found some websites that have implemented these patterns (with source) in Delphi / Object-Pascal, which is my preferred native OO language:

Data::Dumper formatting

I look this up about every couple weeks, so I’m posting it here for posterity. In order to nicely format Data::Dumper output…

I almost always set

$Data::Dumper::Indent = 1;
$Data::Dumper::Sortkeys = 1;

with Data::Dumper. The first statement makes the output more compact and much more readable when your data structure is several levels deep. The second statement makes it easier to scan the output and quickly find the keys you are most interested in.

If the data structure contains binary data or embedded tabs/newlines, also consider

$Data::Dumper::Useqq = 1;

which will output a suitable readable representation for that data.

Much more in the perldoc.

iSecPartners – Auditing high-value applications cheat-sheet

iSecPartners has released on GitHub a “cheat-sheet” for auditing high-value applications. It’s well worth a read.

This list is intended to be a list of additional or more technical things to look for when auditing extremely high value applications. The applications may involve operational security for involved actors (such as law enforcement research), extremely valuable transactions (such as a Stock Trading Application), societal issues that could open users to physical harassment (such as a Gay Dating Application), or technologies designed to be used by journalists operating inside repressive countries.

It is an advanced list – meaning entry level issues such as application logic bypasses, common web vulnerabilities such as XSS and SQLi, or lower level vulnerabilities such as memory corruption are explicitly not covered. It is assumed that the reader is aware of these and similar vulnerabilities and is well trained in their search, exploitation, and remediation.

A good example of the type of analysis to strive for can be shown in Jacob Appelbaum’s analysis of UltraSurf:https://media.torproject.org/misc/2012-04-16-ultrasurf-analysis.pdf